Dhamma Everywhere

This site is a project of students of Sayadaw U Tejaniya. His most recent book in English, Dhamma Everywhere: Welcoming each moment with awareness+wisdom is available for free distribution in limited quantities in various countries.


If you are interested in a copy of the book, please provide your email and mailing address and someone will get back to you. PLEASE NOTE: You must enter your email address in this format: somebody AT somewhere DOT com for Tumblr to accept your message. You can also email us directly at the following email addresses: sutDOTamericaATgmailDOTcom, sutDOTrussiaATgmailDOTcom, and sutDOTeuropeATgmailDOTcom.


Please enjoy the teachings shared here and visit the main website for more, including PDF versions of Dhamma Everywhere, Don't Look Down on the Defilements: They Will Laugh at You and Awareness Alone Is Not Enough.


If you are a student of Sayadaw U Tejaniya and would like to share your gratitude for his teachings, please feel free to submit your testimonial here for others to read.


Please also note that this site and the book from which the content comes by no means are meant to replace the personal guidance of the teacher.



If you want to browse more specifically, check out the tag cloud below:
Posts tagged "present moment"

Because the mind is covered by defilements, we are unable to see dhamma or to understand nature as it is. What is the meaning of nature? It is cause and it is also effect. The cause and effect process itself is nature. Whatever is happening in the present moment is nature, dhamma. Even defilements become dhamma, become nature. Nature is becoming, nature is arising, knowing is arising and awareness is arisingobject and mind, object and mind. In nature, there is nobody there. Nature is not us, not them, not others; nature is nature.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 111)

The Noble Eightfold Path (1)

We are practicing the Noble Eightfold Path. In this moment we can hear. The fact that we are aware that we are hearing is right view. We know what is happening in the present moment. This is right view. This is nature. This is experience. Object is object. Experience is experience. There’s no body, no person. If we have this attitude and we are aware of what is happening, this is right view and right thought.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 106)

(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

The benefits of awareness (4)

We don’t know what’s happening in the present moment. We are blind and we are deaf. Awareness and lack of awareness have two very different qualities. If we have awareness with wisdom (depending on the wisdom quality) awareness will be stronger. The value is also very different.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 105)

(photo by Hor Tuck Loon)

We should be thinking about the practice. If we are thinking the right way, the mind can’t think the wrong way. We prevent delusion when we are aware and when we understand. Knowing what is happening is also right view. Whether it is good or bad, we know what is happening in the present moment.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 104)

If you can stay in the present moment you can be satisfied. Because of knowing, you understand what is happening now, understand what is going on in the present moment, this is real life. Whatever you put into the practice you get in return. If you don’t know what you are already getting, you will want more. You get as much as you put in. If you can stay fully in the present moment, expectations won’t come. No need to regret the past. No need to expect the future. You are trying to think the right way. Thinking is very powerful. If your thinking is reasonable, if your thinking is right, the mind is already calm, relaxed and peaceful.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (pp. 103-104)

Being present (1)

Stay with the peace in the present moment. Just be in the present moment, stay in the present moment. The present moment is the only thing that exists. Past does not exist and future does not exist either. Now, stay in the present moment, peacefully. Just simply be aware in the present moment; the mind is very peaceful not wanting anything. If wanting or craving exists, your duty is just to recognize. No need to judge what is happening.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 103)

(photo by Hor Tuck Loon)

When we meditate, there is no need to hurry. We are not going anywhere. We are staying in the present moment fully.
Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 103)

Expectations and patience (3)

Meditation is recognizing what is happening. Sometimes expectations arise but it’s not a problem. The only thing you need to do is to recognize that the expectation is there. Don’t judge this expectation. Meditation is not about trying to change anything or trying to control anything. It is just recognizing what is happening. Don’t complicate things in the present moment. Be simple and just know. If you don’t have expectations (not wanting anything) the mind is already at peace.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 103)

(photo by Russian Yogi, Retreat in Moscow, July 2012)

Expectations and patience (2)

If you understand in the present moment what you are doing and already getting, understand clearly, the mind can be satisfied or interested. Meditation is a learning process. You can’t hurry.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 103)

(photo by John H., IMS Retreat April/May 2012)

Expectations and patience (1)

For any experience that appears, check to see whether you have a reaction. Are you interested in being mindful? Are you interested in practicing? Why are you aware? Your practice should be simple and natural, with no expectation. You are not trying to gain something. You are trying to be aware in the present moment. If your expectations are high, the mind will not have any interest. It can’t be satisfied with what it already has. The mind becomes bored or disinterested.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 103)

(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

Interest in the activity of the mind (8)

We are not trying to go anywhere. We don’t expect anything. We are not trying to create anything. We are being aware present moment by present moment. The meditating mind must be simple. We are waiting. We wait and watch, as it is, thinking about nature as nature. Nature is not ours, not others’, no body. Nature is no person, nobody. It’s all a natural process as there are causes and there are effects. The cause and effect process and conditioning are nature. The mind is aware, the mind is feeling, the mind is paying attention, and the mind is recognizing. Everything is mind. Mind is working. Mind is happening. Nature is happening, nature is working.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 99)

(photo by Russian Yogi, SOM, Spring 2012)

We check our attitude first before we meditate. What attitude, what background ideas do you have when you meditate?

Do you want anything?

Do you expect anything?

Why are you meditating?

Why are you being mindful?

We want to understand-that is why we are watching and learning. We are not trying to control anything. We are not trying to create anything. We simply want to be in the present moment: Awake, alert, aware.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 97)

When you reflect on Dhamma, reflect on things relevant to your experience of Dhamma. You’ll need awareness to know what is happening and you’ll also be more in the present moment instead of lost in thoughts.
—Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 86)
(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

When you reflect on Dhamma, reflect on things relevant to your experience of Dhamma. You’ll need awareness to know what is happening and you’ll also be more in the present moment instead of lost in thoughts.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 86)

(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

When you reflect on Dhamma, reflect on things relevant to your experience of Dhamma. You’ll need awareness to know what is happening and you’ll also be more in the present moment instead of lost in thoughts.
—Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 86)
(cartoon by Hor Tuck Loon)

When you reflect on Dhamma, reflect on things relevant to your experience of Dhamma. You’ll need awareness to know what is happening and you’ll also be more in the present moment instead of lost in thoughts.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 86)

(cartoon by Hor Tuck Loon)

What is the right attitude for meditation? (1)

Please check your attitude before you begin sitting meditation. What kind of underlying ideas or attitudes are you meditating with? Do you only want a peaceful mental state or do you want to learn about and understand what is happening? The mind can’t be cool and calm when you want certain experiences other than what is happening in this present moment.

The mind is already calm with samādhi when it isn’t following after or looking for specific experiences.

There is no need to go around trying to force the mind to know something because it is already knowing. It is the nature of the mind to know objects that are happening. Check your own mind. There is no need to create anything. You observe objects and experiences that are happening through their own dhamma nature. You just wait and watch with intelligence.

(photo by klaus k.)

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 39)