Dhamma Everywhere

This site was a project of students of Sayadaw U Tejaniya in order to share teachings from his book, Dhamma Everywhere: Welcoming each moment with awareness+wisdom


Please enjoy the teachings shared here and visit the main website for more, including links to audio, video, and PDF versions of Dhamma Everywhere, Don't Look Down on the Defilements: They Will Laugh at You and Awareness Alone Is Not Enough. You may also be interested in this sister Tumblr and our teacher's YouTube channel. Finally, if you are in North America, there are books available for distribution through the US organization of students and supporters, Wisdom Streams. They can be contacted at info@wisdomstreams.org.


Please note that this site and the book from which the content comes by no means are meant to replace the personal guidance of the teacher.

Posts tagged "craving"

The experience may be very simple, but our understanding may be very deep. Because of understanding of object as object (understanding very deeply) we don’t have delusion, craving, or aversion.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

Simple experience, deep understanding (2)

Defilements cover the mind. We can’t understand the nature of defilement. Thats why we need to understand the nature of craving, the nature of aversion, the nature of delusion. Then they have no chance to come in. When the mind is clear, without craving, without aversion, without delusion, the mind is ready to understand. When the mind is clear then wisdom can arise.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

(photo by Austrian Yogi, Kerala/India, October 2012)

My teacher once said, “If you want, it will happen. If you don’t want, it will not happen.” What is the meaning behind this? “If you want, it will happen” means if you want because of craving, you will suffer. The first sentence means wanting comes from craving. For example, someone doesn’t like pain. He wants the pain go away. He wants no pain. The second sentence, “if you don’t want” means if you don’t want through craving or aversion, then suffering doesn’t happen. First “wanting” is because of craving. Second “dont want” is because of wisdom. First is origin of suffering (samudaya) and dukkha. Second is because of path knowledge (magga ñāna) and no suffering (nirodha). If you have craving or wanting, lobha, then dosa and aversion come. Craving and aversion are lobha and dosa. But, magga ñāna, “don’t want,” is because of understanding that you don’t want craving and aversion. That’s why suffering doesn’t arise. If you want something with craving, suffering will surely arise.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 108)

Craving (5)

You don’t get something just because you wanted it. Whatever you get is because of conditioning, because of cause and effect. But people think they’ll get what they want. Actually, you can only get suffering if you want something with craving.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 108)

You can’t get what you want. If you understand the principle that you can’t get something because you want it and that you only get what comes from conditions, cause and effect, then desire gets weaker and weaker. Craving will be less and less. Everything happens because of cause and effect, not because you want it to happen.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 107)

If the mind doesn’t want anything, it is very free.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 107)

Craving (1)
Craving is very tricky; it’s always pushing you. Whatever you think, whatever you say, whatever you do, craving is pushing you, motivating you. There are many ways for craving to come in or arise in your mind. What do you want? Sometimes you should ask yourself: What do I want? Do I want something? There’s always wanting. Because of this wanting, desire, craving, expectation (same meaning), the mind is suffering, tense, and dissatisfied.
—Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 107)
(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

Craving (1)

Craving is very tricky; it’s always pushing you. Whatever you think, whatever you say, whatever you do, craving is pushing you, motivating you. There are many ways for craving to come in or arise in your mind. What do you want? Sometimes you should ask yourself: What do I want? Do I want something? There’s always wanting. Because of this wanting, desire, craving, expectation (same meaning), the mind is suffering, tense, and dissatisfied.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 107)

(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

Being present (1)

Stay with the peace in the present moment. Just be in the present moment, stay in the present moment. The present moment is the only thing that exists. Past does not exist and future does not exist either. Now, stay in the present moment, peacefully. Just simply be aware in the present moment; the mind is very peaceful not wanting anything. If wanting or craving exists, your duty is just to recognize. No need to judge what is happening.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 103)

(photo by Hor Tuck Loon)

Vipassanā samādhi (1)

Samādhi comes from right attitude, right idea, and right knowledge. You are not trying to do anything with craving. You are not trying to do anything with aversion or delusion. You are aware in the present moment with the right attitude. Whatever is happening in the mind and body is just nature. If you think this way that nature is nature, feeling is feeling, the mind is not reacting, liking or disliking. So the mind is peaceful and stable.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 102)

(photo by Russian Yogi, Retreat in Moscow, July 2012)

If you have right attitude then everything is no problem and the object does not disturb you. Any object is a dhamma object, dhamma nature. Even pain can be an object. Pain is an object; no pain is also an object. Object is object; if you understand object as object, the mind can’t attach and can’t resist. The mind with no craving and no aversion has samādhi.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 100)

Lobha is always present. Lobha’s nature is wanting or craving and its nature is to exaggerate things. It is very sticky like glue; it doesn’t let go or release. It never feels satisfied or contented because it thinks there is too little, there is never enough.


Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 90)

There is nothing to be liked about an object. There is also nothing that you get just because you like it. You only get things when the conditions are ripe for you to get them. Whatever is happening is due to nature; you just wait and watch this process objectively. If craving is absent, you will just see what is to be seen. There is nothing attractive about what is happening. There only needs to be knowing.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 90)

(photo by Malaysian Yogi, Retreat at SOM, Dec./Jan. 2011/2012)