Dhamma Everywhere

This site is a project of students of Sayadaw U Tejaniya. His most recent book in English, Dhamma Everywhere: Welcoming each moment with awareness+wisdom is available for free distribution in limited quantities in various countries.


If you are interested in a copy of the book, please provide your email and mailing address and someone will get back to you. PLEASE NOTE: You must enter your email address in this format: somebody AT somewhere DOT com for Tumblr to accept your message. You can also email us directly at the following email addresses: sutDOTamericaATgmailDOTcom, sutDOTrussiaATgmailDOTcom, and sutDOTeuropeATgmailDOTcom.


Please enjoy the teachings shared here and visit the main website for more, including PDF versions of Dhamma Everywhere, Don't Look Down on the Defilements: They Will Laugh at You and Awareness Alone Is Not Enough.


If you are a student of Sayadaw U Tejaniya and would like to share your gratitude for his teachings, please feel free to submit your testimonial here for others to read.


Please also note that this site and the book from which the content comes by no means are meant to replace the personal guidance of the teacher.



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ashintejaniya:

Daily Life Series: Shifting Gears to Neutral. How can we work and observe in the midst of a hectic daily life or overwhelming defilements?

So sorry for the delay in posting a link to the Tumblr that is currently being used to share Sayadaw U Tejaniya’s teachings. There are a lot of videos from personal interviews with students at the Shwe Oo Min meditation center outside of Yangon, Myanmar on this blog. Please go and follow Sayadaw U Tejaniya to continue benefiting from the Dhamma!

Because the mind is covered by defilements, we are unable to see dhamma or to understand nature as it is. What is the meaning of nature? It is cause and it is also effect. The cause and effect process itself is nature. Whatever is happening in the present moment is nature, dhamma. Even defilements become dhamma, become nature. Nature is becoming, nature is arising, knowing is arising and awareness is arisingobject and mind, object and mind. In nature, there is nobody there. Nature is not us, not them, not others; nature is nature.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 111)

The chance to practice mindfulness meditation is very rare

To be aware of something sounds simple, but this technique is very difficult to practice. We can practice this way, with this technique when a Buddha arises. But if we have no Buddha, we practice. Truly practicing mindfulness meditation is very rare.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 111)

(photo by Swedish Yogi, Retreat with SUT, Czech Republic April/May 2011)

We have many experiences throughout the day; we are always meeting experiences. But when our watching mind is purified, when awareness and understanding are complete, this simple experience becomes very strange [extraordinary]. Because we have always had the wrong view when knowing experience and now we have right view, right understanding, our view is oppositevery strange [extraordinary].

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (pp. 110-111)

The experience may be very simple, but our understanding may be very deep. Because of understanding of object as object (understanding very deeply) we don’t have delusion, craving, or aversion.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

Simple experience, deep understanding (2)

Defilements cover the mind. We can’t understand the nature of defilement. Thats why we need to understand the nature of craving, the nature of aversion, the nature of delusion. Then they have no chance to come in. When the mind is clear, without craving, without aversion, without delusion, the mind is ready to understand. When the mind is clear then wisdom can arise.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

(photo by Austrian Yogi, Kerala/India, October 2012)

When you are aware of some sensation or some object, what do you understand about this object? Now, what do you understand? Do you understand something? Sometimes you can know but you don’t understand. You know many objects and you are aware of many things. What is your purpose?

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

Anicca, dukkha, anatta

Nothing stays the same. Everything is always changing. Nature is happening because of conditioning. Because of conditions, objects are arising. This is the meaning of anicca. You need to understand whatever is happening (thinking is happening, sensation is happening, knowing mind is happening, awareness is happening); you need to notice that its happening. Arising, happening, becoming. Happening, becoming, and arising. Happening is anicca, happening is dukkha, and happening is anatta. When your mind is purified you can understand. You can understand happening is impermanence, happening is dukkha, and happening is cause and effect, anatta, no body. Awareness is noticing everything that is happening; object is also happening, knowing is also happening, sensation is also happening, thinking is also happening. Its all new, new, new.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

(photo by Austrian Yogi, Cambodia, January 2010)

Strengthening the mind (6)

For someone who has been meditating or practicing for a long time, the mind must be of a better and better quality. The mind is more aware, more stable and more peaceful.

There is more understanding. It should be like this. When we have more understanding, we have less resistance and fewer reactions. Because of reactions, we suffer. Because of learning, we understand. With understanding comes confidence.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 110)

(photo by Russian Yogi, Retreat in Moscow, July 2012)

Strengthening the mind (5)
How do we make the mind stronger? When we are aware, with the right attitude and right understanding, then the mind has wisdom and it becomes stronger. This is not because we are putting in a lot of energy; if we use too much energy the mind will become tired. If we try to see something, the mind becomes tenser. We are cultivating the quality of awareness to make the mind stronger and stronger. If we have awareness with wisdom and continuity, then the mind becomes stronger and stronger. When the mind becomes stronger it can do its job.
—Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)
(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

Strengthening the mind (5)

How do we make the mind stronger? When we are aware, with the right attitude and right understanding, then the mind has wisdom and it becomes stronger. This is not because we are putting in a lot of energy; if we use too much energy the mind will become tired. If we try to see something, the mind becomes tenser. We are cultivating the quality of awareness to make the mind stronger and stronger. If we have awareness with wisdom and continuity, then the mind becomes stronger and stronger. When the mind becomes stronger it can do its job.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)

(photo by Indonesian Yogi, Retreat with SUT, BrahmaViharaArama, Bali July 2011)

We are not trying to see the object. We are not trying to look for something. We are trying to make the meditating mind stronger and stronger.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)

Our duty is to make the quality of awareness stronger. Stronger awareness means awareness and wisdom are working together continuously. This is awareness with the right view, right attitude, right idea, and right thought. If this is continuous, then the mind is stronger and stronger. We only need to do this. If the mind becomes stronger it can do its job. Dhamma does its job and nature does its job.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)

Depending on your quality of mind, the object may be perceived differently and the view changes.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)

Your watching mind must be strong and purified, with less defilement. If your mind is ready, understanding arises. So take care of your mind, take care of your practice and take care of your watching mind. Cultivate it so that it is stronger and stronger.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)

We don’t appreciate what we are doing. We are always complaining or thinking about what is happening. Experience may be good or bad, right or wrong - it’s not important. Experience is experience. We need to appreciate and we need to recognize that the mind is working, being aware and watching. If our experience is good, the mind becomes happy. Happy, happy! If our experience is bad, we become very sad, upset. This means that we don’t understand. We must understand that nature is nature and object is object. We let go of experience. We are not trying to hold onto any experience or object. We are trying to appreciate that the mind is working. We need only to check the quality of awareness of the watching, meditating mind. Is the meditating mind working or not? Is the mind interested or not? Is it strong or not? Just check.

Sayadaw U Tejaniya, Dhamma Everywhere (p. 109)